Cordoba’s famous Roman Bridge, or Puente Romano, dates from the 1st Century BC and was extensively rebuilt in the 10th Century during the Moorish occupation of the city. Sitting low over the waters of the Guadalquivir, it is supported by 17 stone arches, of which just two belonged to the original structure.

Cordoba - old drawing of bridge

Cordoba - Puente Romano

Cordoba - Puente Romano

At one end of the bridge is the Cahalorra Tower. Dating from the late 1100’s, the tower was constructed by the rulers of Moorish Córdoba to protect the Puente Romano. It now houses a museum.

Cordoba - Cahalorra Tower

At the other end of the Roman bridge is the Puerta del Puente. This was constructed in 1572 in order that Córdoba might have one of the grandest entrances in southern Spain. It was rebuilt and added to several times over the centuries – most notably in 1912 on the orders of King Alfonso XIII of Spain – and today provides a suitably dramatic welcome to Córdoba for visitors approaching from the Roman bridge. I believe that you can also take a tour to the rooftop.

Cordoba - Puerta del Puente

Cordoba - Puerta del Puente

If you have time, take a walk across the bridge and also along the riverbank where you will find interesting things to photograph. In the middle of the bridge, you will find a 17th century statue of Saint Raphael.

Cordoba - Puente Romano

There is an old watermill from the Moorish era which was used to gather water for the Alcazar Palace. Several old buildings can be found in the riverbed as well.

Cordoba - Puente Romano

Cordoba - Puente Romano

Cordoba - Puente Romano

Cordoba - Puente Romano

By far the best photographic experience is an evening photoshoot looking across to the city when it is lit up. Take photos from both sides, then walk into the city and wander around the courtyard of the Mezquita or just take in the sights of the city by night.

Cordoba - Puente Romano by night

Cordoba - Puente Romano by night

Cordoba - Puente Romano by night

Another Roman influence in Cordoba is the remains of a Roman Temple which were only discovered in the 1950’s. Built around the first century AD by Emperor Claudius and renovated in the second century AD, the temple boasted a plethora of giant columns, several of which remain today, reaching up into the sky amid modern apartment blocks and offices.

Cordoba - Roman relics

Cordoba - Roman relics

There are a few other Roman relics scattered around the site.

Cordoba - Roman relics